Clinton’s Leaked eMails Confirm Libya Plunder by Killing Qaddafi

Covert Geopolitics

It was broad daylight robbery and murder when US , France, and the rest of NATO, hunted down Muammar Qaddafi, and destroyed the most prosperous nation in Africa, i.e. Libya., in 2011.

The above picture is taken during the G8 Summit Italy, in 2009,.

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2 gedachtes over “Clinton’s Leaked eMails Confirm Libya Plunder by Killing Qaddafi

  1. Bron: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/battle-libya-almost-over-battle-its-144-tons-gold

    The Battle For Libya Is Almost Over… As Is The Battle For Its 144 Tons Of Gold

    by Tyler Durden
    Aug 21, 2011 6:42 PM

    Following a 6 month stalemate in which neither side had attained any advantage, it suddenly took just a few days for the Libyan rebel forces to steamroll unopposed into Tripoli. While we are confident that the political aftermath of this outcome will be very much comparable to what is happening in Egypt right now, many wonder why it is that the Libyan situation has progressed with such speed. Perhaps the answer can be found in the 143.8 tons of gold held by the Libyan Central Bank. Granted it is nowhere near close the 366 tons of gold that Venezuela supposedly has per the WGC, most of it likely held offshore and not being repatriated, the question of where the global gold cartel may find some of the much needed physical to satisfy Chavez’ demands has been now answered. Of course we assume that said gold has not already departed Libya in direction Caracas over the past 6 months. Which, in retrospect, we probably should, as it would explain why gold is now at $1875 and rapidly rising.

  2. Bron: http://fubarandgrill.org/node/1056

    Rooting for Gaddafi – by Mark E. Smith

    Submitted by folkie on 30 March 2011

    Discussions Libya USA

    The majority of Iraqis who hated Sadaam Hussein and welcomed the US invasion, will now admit that Iraq was better off under Sadaam. With that in mind, I’ve compiled a short list of the reasons I’m rooting for Gaddafi to win in Libya.

    1. I was suspicious all along that the Libyan uprising against Gaddafi was inspired by the CIA in an attempt to get control of Libya’s oil. The US has a long history of funding opposition groups in countries it wishes to control. So I wasn’t in the least surprised to learn that the new Libyan rebel leader spent 20 years living in Virginia near CIA headquarters and that his source of income during that time is unknown: http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/03/26/2136063/new-libyan-rebel-leader-spent.html Nor am I surprised to know that he has admitted contacts with CIA Al Quedah assets: http://www.infowars.com/libyan-rebel-leader-admits-connection-to-cia-al-qaeda-asset-in-iraq/

    2. The rebels are calling for elections. The United States is notorious for rigging elections both at home http://impactglassman.blogspot.com/2011/03/subject-election-theft-in-united-states.html and abroad. Even with honest elections, it takes money to run a successful election campaign, so the ones who win are usually rich and not apt to represent the interests of the poor. In the US, people vote for officials they cannot hold accountable, and are then powerless. Anger is deflected towards the next election, when people again vote for officials they can’t hold accountable. Voting for tyrants is not the same as having a voice in government.

    3. Why would Libyans rebel against prosperity and against their own health and education? The Libyan people have been among the most prosperous in the region, thanks to the fact that Gaddafi shared his country’s oil money with his people and funded free health care and education. The corporations who run the US consider free health care and free education to be Communist evils, and believe that money should go to private hands rather than be shared with a nation’s poor. If NATO succeeds in ousting Gaddafi, Libyans are likely to lose their free health care, their free educations, and their prosperity. http://blackhistory.com/cgi-bin/blog.cgi?cid=10&blog_id=199233

    4, The anti-Gaddafi propaganda is not credible. Yes, a Libyan woman may have been raped by Gaddafi’s troops, and many other Libyan women, unknown to us, may be in the same situation. But look at the US. Rape is rampant in the US military http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/features/2010/12/2010122182546344551.html and is common in US prisons http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2005/09/hitchens200509 While it is true that Gaddafi has imprisoned many Libyans, his regime doesn’t come close to the US, which has a greater number of prisoners and a larger percentage of its citizens imprisoned than any other country on earth: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/23/world/americas/23iht-23prison.12253738.html If imprisonment and rape justify outside military intervention, then the US heads the list of countries where such intervention would be justified.

    5. While some unconfirmed estimates say that Gaddafi has killed thousands of people, the United States has killed millions: http://www.projectcensored.org/top-stories/articles/1-over-one-million-iraqi-deaths-caused-by-us-occupation/

    I could make a longer list. The US has already broken its word in Libya. Originally saying it would not lead, it has handed over leadership to NATO, which the US leads and controls. Originally saying it would not have troops on the ground, it is reported to already have troops on the ground. And the US is considering violating international law by arming the rebels, something it appears to have been doing all along anyway. The US has ignored much stronger cases for humanitarian intervention, such as in the Congo and in Palestine, and seems to only intervene when there is a lot of oil that the US covets.

    But I know very little about Libya. I live in the US. We have elections but we don’t have free health care, we don’t have free higher education, and with at least nine million homeless and only 400 people owning at least half of United States wealth, poverty has been drastically increasing and life expectancy decreasing. The United States has long engaged in union busting and we can see in Wisconsin how the last remnants of worker’s unions are under attack.

    I can’t see any way in which the Libyan people will benefit from ousting Gaddafi, and I see many ways in which their situation is likely to become worse. So while mine may be a minority opinion, I’m rooting for Gaddafi.

    ‹ Europe Gets Shock Therapy like Latin America in the 1980s and 1990s – by Carlos Bedoya
    Incident in New Baghdad: (Open Letter to Former US Soldiers and Critics of Ethan McCord) – by Carol Grayson ›
    »

    Hugo Chavez wants his gold back.
    Submitted by folkie on 23 August 2011 – 3:51pm.

    But of course the US banks he stored gold in don’t have it. Not sure what they did with it, but JP Morgan Chase offered to pay him cash instead, admitting that they no longer have the gold bullion he entrusted them with. Which is kind of funny, since Chavez, being the President of a country, can print all the paper currency he wants and certainly doesn’t want worthless US dollars that are backed by nothing except “the full faith and credit” of a government in which nobody has any more faith and which has long since maxed out its credit.

    Chavez was planning to move his gold from US, UK, and other NATO banks to banks in Brazil, Russia, and China. I’m sure those countries were looking forward to it. But since he can’t get his gold back because the thieving banksters have stolen it, it should be interesting to see what China does now.

    The idea of the NATO invasion of Libya was to grab Libya’s gold reserves and use it to pay back Chavez. Which wouldn’t have worked, as he insists on testing to ensure that the gold he gets back is the same gold he had stored. But now that the Libya invasion is falling apart, there’s no chance whatsoever of that happening. As far as I can determine, Libya did have billions in foreign banks that was seized, but it was fiat currency, not gold. I think Gaddafi kept Libya’s gold in Libya.

    Anyway, the US and NATO have spent millions invading Libya and have killed thousands of Libyan civilians plus doing a great deal of damage to the Libyan infrastructure. But they no longer seem to have much in the way of support.

    While the UK recognized the Libyan Transitional Council, Russia has not.

    This could be the end game. Empires fall when they become militarily overextended and the US seems to have gone past the point of no return.

    In the Rixos hotel in Tripoli where the international reporters stay, US reporters were found to be CIA spies rather than journalists and the hotel had to be divided with actual journalists on one side and spooks on the other so that they didn’t kill each other. The spooks, of course, no longer have any credibility, as they were broadcasting that Tripoli had fallen and Saif Gaddafi has been arrested when Saif himself came to the hotel wearing pants and a green t-shirt with no body armor, and took some reporters on a tour of Tripoli so that they could see that Gaddafi was still in control and that the city was calm. The bombing is always at night and the CIA-paid traitors come in afterwards in the daytime, so they are easily picked off.

    The US-led NATO is trying desperately to kill all Libyans and bomb the country to rubble, as it mostly succeeded in doing in Iraq, but if the gold market collapses and the US can’t get any further credit, it may run out of the millions of dollars it needs to keep bombing civilians every day in Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Iraq. I don’t think many countries would be willing to accept dollars instead of getting their gold back and I’m almost certain that Chavez won’t.

    Stay tuned.

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